Shown below is information about 1/5 Marines and Navy Corpsmen who received medals of valor during the Vietnam War.  This information may not include all medals awarded to those who served in 1/5 during the war and it does not include the awarding of Bronze Stars or Purple Hearts.  We are including some information to help 1/5 veterans obtain records of their military service and medals of valor.

MEDAL OF HONOR
THE MEDAL OF HONOR WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1861

THE CRITERIA: 
FOR CONSPICUOUS GALLANTRY AND INTREPIDITY AT THE RISK OF LIFE, ABOVE AND BEYOND THE CALL OF DUTY, IN ACTION INVOLVING ACTUAL CONFLICT WITH AN OPPOSING ARMED FORCE.

(LISTED BELOW ARE THE 57 US MARINE CORPS RECIPIENTS OF THE US NAVY MEDAL OF HONOR DURING THE VIET NAM WAR) ???

Presented by the President in the Name of the Congress, it is the highest honor that can be bestowed upon any American.  The men who wear it call themselves "recipients" (not winners), for what they received it for was not a contest...it was a time of terror and death where their valor was tested, then recognized by a grateful Nation.  All of them feel that they didn't win The Medal...they RECEIVED it. 
Frequently called "The Congressional Medal of Honor", its true title is simply:

MEDAL OF HONOR

*DAVIS, RODNEY MAXWELL

Rank and organization: Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division
Place and date: Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam, 6 September 1967
Entered service at: Macon, Georgia
Born: 7 April 1942, Macon, Georgia

Citation:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as the right guide of the 2d Platoon, Company B, in action against enemy forces. Elements of the 2d Platoon were pinned down by a numerically superior force of attacking North Vietnamese Army Regulars. Remnants of the platoon were located in a trench line where Sgt. Davis was directing the fire of his men in an attempt to repel the enemy attack. Disregarding the enemy hand grenades and high volume of small arms and mortar fire, Sgt. Davis moved from man to man shouting words of encouragement to each of them while firing and throwing grenades at the onrushing enemy. When an enemy grenade landed in the trench in the midst of his men, Sgt. Davis, realizing the gravity of the situation, and in a final valiant act of complete self-sacrifice, instantly threw himself upon the grenade, absorbing with his body the full and terrific force of the explosion. Through his extraordinary initiative and inspiring valor in the face of almost certain death, Sgt. Davis saved his comrades from injury and possible loss of life, enabled his platoon to hold its vital position, and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the U.S. Naval Service.  He gallantly gave his life for his country.

 


  Jimmy Wayne Phipps            

Citation:

The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the MEDAL OF HONOR posthumously to PRIVATE FIRST CLASS JIMMY W. PHIPPS, UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS for service as set forth in the following CITATION:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a combat Engineer with Company B, First Engineer Battalion, First Marine Division in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 27 May 1969, Private First Class Phipps, was a member of a two-man combat engineer demolition team assigned to locate and destroy enemy artillery ordnance and concealed firing devices. After he had expended all of his explosives and blasting caps, Private First Class Phipps discovered a 175mm high explosive artillery round in a rice paddy. Suspecting that the enemy had attached at the artillery round to a secondary explosive device, he warned other Marines in the area to move to covered positions and prepared to destroy the round with a hand grenade. As he was attaching the hand grenade to a stake beside the artillery round, the fuse of the enemy's secondary explosive device ignited. Realizing that his assistant and the platoon commander were both with a few meters of him and that the imminent explosion could kill all three men, Private First Class Phipps grasped the hand grenade to his chest and dived forward to cover the enemy's explosive and the artillery round with his body, thereby shielding his companions from the detonation while absorbing the full and tremendous impact with his own body. Private First Class Phipp's indomitable courage, inspiring initiative and selfless devotion to duty saved the lives of two Marines and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

/S/ RICHARD M. NIXON

Editor's Note:

Jimmy Wayne Phipps was born on, in Santa Monica , California . He attended Marina Del Ray Junior High School in Culver City , California and Venice High School in Venice , California .

He left high school to enlist in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve on 3 January 1968 and was discharged on 7 January 1968 to enlist in the.

He completed recruit training with the 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, Recruit Training Regiment, Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, California on 14 March 1968. Transferred to Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, he underwent individual combat training with Company L, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Infantry Training Regiment, followed by basic infantry training which he completed in May 1968. ]

From June until August 1968, he was a student with the Marine Aviation Detachment, Naval Air Technical Training Command, Memphis , Tennessee . Transferred to Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, he attended the Marine Corps Engineer Schools, until the following October. He was promoted to private first class on 1 October 1968.

In December 1968, he was transferred to the Republic of Vietnam where he served as a combat engineer with Company B, 1st Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division. He was initially attached to Company C, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines (C/1/5) as its combat engineer. He was then detached and returned to Company B, but in late May, volunteered to return to the field with C/1/5. While participating in combat in what was referred to as the " Arizona Territory ," located in the vicinity of An Hoa on 27 May 1969, he was killed in action during the combat action for which he was awarded the Medal of Honor

He died May 27, 1969 and is buried in Woodlawn Cemetery , Santa Monica California

http://www.tecom.usmc.mil/HD/Whos_Who/Phipps_JW.htm              

 

NAVY CROSS

Authorized February 4, 1919, the Navy Cross was the Navy's 3rd highest award for combat heroism and other distinguished services.  On August 7, 1942 Congress made the Navy Cross a COMBAT ONLY decoration with precedence over the Distinguished Service Medal, making it the Navy's 2nd highest award ranking below only the Medal of Honor.  It shares this position with the Army's Distinguished Service Cross and the Air Force Cross.

BARNETT, ROBERT L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert L. Barnett (2259704), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Machine Gun Squad Leader with Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 9 May 1969, during a battalion-sized reconnaissance in force in Quang Nam Province, Corporal Barnett was moving with the point position across rice paddies bordered by tree lines when the Marines came under intense small-arms fire and were pinned down by a large North Vietnamese Army force. During the initial burst of enemy fire, four men in the lead platoon were wounded, including Corporal Barnett. Observing the wounded Corpsman and another Marine lying in a dangerously exposed position, Corporal Barnett completely disregarded his own safety as he rushed across the fire-swept terrain to reach his fallen comrades and administer first aid. Locating another casualty, he ignored his own painful injuries as he braved the enemy fire to run 100 meters across the open terrain to reach the wounded Marine. Although injured a second time, he managed to assist in moving the casualty to a covered position. He refused evacuation for himself and boldly delivered effective fire which killed four North Vietnamese soldiers and suppressed the hostile fire sufficiently to enable the aircraft to land. Although wounded again by enemy fire, he remained oblivious to the intense pain and valiantly continued to deliver a heavy volume of accurate and effective covering fire while the casualties were embarked and the helicopter lifted out of the hazardous area. Despite his weakened condition, he continued to aggressively engage the enemy until wounded a fourth time and medically evacuated. His heroic actions inspired all who observed him and contributed materially to the defeat of the enemy. By his courage, bold initiative, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Corporal Barnett upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Minneapolis , Minnesota

BOGAN, RICHARD E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Richard E. Bogan (2357980), Lance Corporal [then Private First Class], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 12 April 1968. While conducting a night ambush near the village of Thon Ha Vinh , Thua Thien Province, Lance Corporal Bogan alertly observed several North Vietnamese Army soldiers approaching his position. Reacting instantly, he directed a heavy volume of fire upon the hostile force, inflicting numerous casualties and forcing the enemy to disperse. Within a few moments, an enemy grenade landed among the Marines, and exploded harmlessly. Almost immediately, another grenade impacted extremely close to Corporal Bogan and a companion. Disregarding his own safety, he shouted a warning to his comrade and unhesitatingly jumped on top of the missile, absorbing the blast with his body. Although seriously wounded, he moved to his squad leader's position and informed him of the situation. By his dauntless courage, initiative and selfless efforts in behalf of another, Corporal Bogan saved his comrade from serious injury or possible death and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals.
Home Town : Lebanon , Indiana

 

  BRANDTNER, MARTIN L.
(First Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Martin L. Brandtner (0-80625), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer of Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 3 September 1968, while conducting a reconnaissance in force near the village of Lan Phouc in Quang Nam Province, the lead platoon of Company D became pinned down by intense automatic weapons fire from a large North Vietnamese Army force. As he moved forward to assess the situation, Captain Brandtner was wounded by grenade launcher fire from an enemy soldier standing in a nearby trench. With complete disregard for his own safety, Captain Brandtner boldly exposed himself to the hostile fire and hurling a hand grenade, killed the North Vietnamese soldier. Suddenly, the Marines came under an intense North Vietnamese hand grenade attack, and when one of the lethal objects landed at Captain Brandtner's feet, he unhesitatingly seized the grenade and threw it back at the enemy. On two more occasions he completely disregarded his own safety to seize hand grenades which were thrown near his position and hurl them toward the hostile force. When another grenade landed in the midst of four nearby Marines, Captain Brandtner fearlessly rushed to their position, picked up the lethal object and hurled it away from his companions. Then, concerned only for the welfare of his fellow Marines, he knocked two of the men to the ground and quickly placed himself on top of them, thereby absorbing the fragments from the exploding grenade in his protective armor and preventing possible death or serious injury to his companions. Realizing the numerical superiority of the enemy, he consolidated his company's position and skillfully adjusted effective supporting arms fire which caused the hostile force to flee and enabled his Marines to overrun the objective. By his courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and selfless devotion to duty at the risk of his life, Captain Brandtner sustained and enhanced the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Minneapolis , Minnesota
Other Award: Navy Cross w/Gold Star ( Vietnam )

  BRANDTNER, MARTIN L.
(Second Award)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Award of the Navy Cross to Martin L. Brandtner (0-80625), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in action while serving as the Commanding Officer, Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 11 September 1968. Assigned a mission to conduct a search and destroy operation near the village of My Binh , Quang Dia Loc District, Quang Nam Province , Captain Brandtner selected his defensive position and began deploying his platoons for their assigned night activities. As the First Platoon departed, en route to their night ambush site, they began receiving intense small arms, automatic weapons and rocket fire from a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. Simultaneously, the enemy, approximately the size of the two North Vietnamese Army companies, began an attack on the Command Group with 82-mm. mortars, intense automatic weapons fire and P40 rockets. Quickly analyzing the situation and immediately realizing the seriousness and the danger involved, Captain Brandtner disregarded his own personal safety and moved forward to an extremely exposed position in order that he could personally control the battle at hand. When the enemy began the first of a series of "human wave" sapper attacks against the company's position, he calmly and with outstanding presence of mind moved from position to position reorganizing, encouraging and rallying his outnumbered and dazed company into an inspired fighting unit which completely stopped the momentum of the enemy attack and forced them to withdraw. Realizing the enemy were regrouping for subsequent attacks, he calmly adjusted his supporting artillery fire to within 200 meters of his lines, again raising havoc and confusion within the enemy's ranks. When the North Vietnamese Army units began their second attack, the devastating fires of a well organized Marine Corps rifle company caught them off balance and inflicted heavy enemy casualties. Twice more, the determined enemy launched massive "human wave" assaults on the perimeter of Company D, but the steadfast efforts of the men of the company proved to be too much for the now overwhelmed and demoralized enemy. After more than two hours of persistent attempts to overrun the company, the enemy broke contact. Daylight revealed 67 North Vietnamese dead as mute testimony to the ferocious encounter that had taken place. The number of enemy dead and wounded evacuated could not be estimated. Company D suffered only one Marine killed and fourteen wounds serious enough to require evacuation. By his outstanding courage, superb leadership and unswerving devotion to duty, Captain Brandtner served to inspire all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Minneapolis , Minnesota
Other Award: Navy Cross ( Vietnam )

CHEATWOOD, PAUL R.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Paul R. Cheatwood (2345578), Corporal [then Lance Corporal], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Mortarman with Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 16 February 1968 , Corporal Cheatwood's company was attacking North Vietnamese Army forces occupying the city of Hue . Crossing an open area toward a building, the Marines suddenly came under enemy sniper fire, killing one man, wounding four others and pinning down the platoon. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Corporal Cheatwood unhesitatingly exposed himself to the hostile fire as he assumed a kneeling position and skillfully delivered suppressive fire at the enemy emplacement, enabling a Corpsman to move to the assistance of the casualties. After assisting the Corpsman in providing first aid for two casualties, his unit was again pinned down by automatic weapons fire. Reacting instantly, he rapidly directed a heavy volume of rifle fire at the hostile position and, crawling forward, assisted a wounded Marine. When the Corpsman arrived, Corporal Cheatwood maneuvered toward the sniper's position and hurled several hand grenades into the building, killing two North Vietnamese soldiers. Subsequently volunteering to lead a search for an enemy machine gun that had been firing at his company, Corporal Cheatwood became separated from his men as he moved through a building. Electing to continue his mission, he alertly observed eight enemy soldiers in a nearby structure. Reacting instantly, he threw numerous hand grenades and fired his pistol into the building. Although painfully wounded, he inflicted numerous casualties on the enemy soldiers and forced the remainder to flee in panic and confusion. His bold initiative and outstanding professionalism were an inspiration to all who observed him and contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission. By his exceptional courage, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Corporal Cheatwood upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Tallapoosa , Georgia

  DRISCOLL, THOMAS B.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Thomas B. Driscoll (2135382), Corporal [then Lance Corporal], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Forward Air Controller for Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 4 and 6 September 1967. On 4 September, Company D came under devastating enemy automatic weapons, mortar and grenade fire from an estimated regiment of North Vietnamese Regulars, wounding several Marines and the forward observer. Corporal Driscoll immediately assumed the duties of the forward observer, calling in and adjusting artillery with uncanny accuracy and breaking up the enemy attack. During darkness, it was necessary to mark the landing zone for the emergency medical evacuation of casualties. Undaunted by the heavy sniper fire, he unhesitatingly procured a strobe light and held it over his head to guide in the helicopters. On 6 September, the company was again taken under heavy enemy fire. Observing two Marines wounded and lying in an open area approximately 100 meters from his position, he courageously and with complete disregard for his own safety, moved forward and retrieved one man. Being assured the man was in a safe position, he returned to the second wounded Marine and carried him back to safety. When fifteen to twenty Viet Cong attempted to penetrate the perimeter, he boldly exposed himself to the withering small-arms fire and gallantly led a one-man assault on the enemy, hurling grenades and breaking up the enemy attack. Upon returning to his position, he supervised the establishment of a defensive perimeter. By his bold initiative, gallant fighting spirit and loyal devotion to duty, Corporal Driscoll reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Richmond , Virginia

*EVANS, RICHARD ALLEN, JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Richard Allen Evans, Jr. (2427562), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 29 August 1968, Private Evans was maneuvering his fire team toward known enemy positions when the Marines suddenly came under antitank rocket and automatic weapons fire from a well-entrenched North Vietnamese Army company. Although he was seriously wounded during the initial burst of fire, he resolutely refused medical attention for himself in order to continue leading his men against the enemy. Observing five North Vietnamese soldiers maneuvering to a position on his unit's flank, Private Evans quickly moved across the fire-swept terrain to a vantage point where he delivered a highly accurate fire that killed all five enemy soldiers. Wounded a second time by fire from another hostile emplacement, he realized that his team was in an untenable position. Concerned only for the welfare of his comrades, Private Evans directed his men to withdraw to a more defensible position and, ignoring his own painful injuries, selflessly remained behind providing covering fire for their movement. Continuing his gallant efforts in an attempt to ensure that his fellow Marines would reach a position of relative safety, he fearlessly rushed forward in a determined assault, firing his rifle into the hostile emplacement until he was mortally wounded by enemy machine-gun fire. His bold initiative and uncommon valor undoubtedly saved the lives of three of his fellow Marines. By his courage, intrepid fighting spirit, and selfless devotion to duty, Private Evans inspired all who observed him and sustained and enhanced the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Independence , Missouri

*FEDEROWSKI, ROBERT ALLAN
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Robert Allan Federowski (2204671), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the evening of 24 May 1968, Corporal Federowski's unit had established an ambush on a suspected enemy infiltration route in Thua Thien Province and became heavily engaged with a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force. Ignoring the hostile small-arms fire and B-40 rockets impacting around him, Corporal Federowski boldly moved about the hazardous terrain, shouting words of encouragement to his men and skillfully directing their fire. Suddenly, an enemy hand grenade landed near him and several other Marines. With complete disregard for his own safety, Corporal Federowski fearlessly placed himself between the grenade and his comrades. As he attempted to hurl it away from his position, the grenade detonated, and he was mortally wounded. His bold initiative and sincere concern for the welfare of his comrades inspired all who observed him and saved the lives of several fellow Marines. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit, and selfless devotion to duty, Corporal Federowski upheld the highest traditions of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Lansing , Illinois

  FELTON, SAMUEL L., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Samuel L. Felton, Jr. (2479014), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. Early on the morning of 11 June 1969 , Company C was established in a battalion night defensive perimeter two miles west of An Hoa Combat Base when its sector came under a heavy volume of rocket, mortar, recoilless rifle, and automatic-weapons fire followed by a determined assault by an estimated 100 North Vietnamese Army soldiers. When communications with a three-man listening post seventy-five meters forward of the perimeter were lost, Private First Class Felton established voice contact and learned that all three Marines were wounded and unable to return to the perimeter unassisted. With resolute determination, he left his fighting hole and although wounded by enemy fire, continued across the open terrain until he reached the beleaguered Marines. After administering first aid and ensuring that no equipment or ordnance was left behind, he provided covering fire as he directed the two least seriously wounded men across the hazardous area to the company lines. Despite his weakened condition from loss of blood, Private First Class Felton began to carry the most seriously injured Marine through the knee-deep mud and water of the rice paddy. Suddenly two hostile soldiers jumped in front of him, blocking his chance to return to friendly lines. Reacting instantly, he fired his M-16 rifle with one hand while supporting the wounded Marine with his injured arm, killing both of the enemy, and fearlessly continued his Herculean efforts until he delivered his wounded comrade to the battalion aid station. He then returned to the perimeter and continued fighting the attacking force until the enemy was repulsed. His heroic actions and bold fighting spirit inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in saving the lives of several fellow Marines. By his courage, daring initiative, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, Private First Class Felton upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Lorain, Ohio

GREEN, MAURICE O. V.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Maurice O. V. Green (103516), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as the Intelligence Officer of the First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 27 October 1968. First Lieutenant Green traveled to the Company D Command Post in Quang Nam Province to interrogate two North Vietnamese Army prisoners. During the night, the Marine perimeter was breached by an enemy engineer unit hurling satchel charges throughout the position. Simultaneously, a large North Vietnamese force initiated a savage attack employing mortars, small arms, automatic weapons and antitank rockets. Alertly observing the commanding officer among the seriously wounded, First Lieutenant Green unhesitatingly assumed command of the company and repeatedly exposed himself to the continuous hail of enemy fire as he began rallying the Marine defenders. Completely disregarding his own safety, he fearlessly moved about the fire-swept terrain to each Marine position, shouting words of encouragement to the men and directing their fire at the hostile soldiers. Ignoring the enemy rounds impacting near him, he swiftly retrieved a radio from a seriously injured radio operator and boldly adjusted supporting arms fire on the attackers with pinpoint accuracy, forcing them to withdraw in panic and confusion. Rapidly assessing the turn of events, First Lieutenant Green courageously mounted and skillfully directed a determined counterattack in pursuit of the fleeing enemy soldiers while continuing to direct effective supporting arms fire on them. After contact had been broken with the enemy, he ensured that the wounded were medically treated and made arrangements for their evacuation. His daring initiative and heroic efforts inspired all who served with him and were instrumental in his company's accounting for eight hostile soldiers confirmed killed. By his courage, bold leadership and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of great personal danger, First Lieutenant Green upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Birmingham , Alabama

GRESHAM, MICHAEL E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Michael E. Gresham (2378513), Sergeant [then Lance Corporal], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the night of 11 September 1968, while occupying a defensive position in Quang Nam Province, Company D came under intense rocket and mortar fire, immediately followed by a heavy volume of grenades and satchel charges supporting a human wave assault by a North Vietnamese Army company. When the hostile attack was initiated, Sergeant Gresham was at the platoon command post, and when the building was struck by several rocket rounds, the platoon commander, platoon sergeant, and both other squad leaders were wounded seriously. Momentarily stunned, Sergeant Gresham recovered quickly and, realizing that he was the senior Marine remaining uninjured, unhesitatingly assumed command of the platoon. With complete disregard for his own safety, he raced through the intense enemy fire, and moving from one position to another, shouted words of encouragement to his men and directed their fire, inflicting numerous losses on the advancing hostile soldiers. Ignoring the enemy rounds impacting nearby, he moved throughout the fire-swept area redistributing ammunition and assisting injured men to covered positions. Assessing the situation, he concluded that the rapid expenditure of ammunition and number of casualties his platoon had sustained made his position untenable. Quickly repairing an inoperable radio, Sergeant Gresham appraised the company commander of the situation and, at his direction, skillfully redeployed his men to an alternate location. Obtaining ammunition and hand grenades from adjacent units, Sergeant Gresham rapidly distributed them to his men and, when the enemy force again attacked, he directed his platoon's devastating fire and successfully repelled the hostile onslaught. His heroic and decisive action prevented the platoon from being overrun and saved the lives of several Marines. By his courage, bold initiative, and selfless devotion to duty, Sergeant Gresham inspired all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Macon , Georgia

HARRINGTON, MYRON C.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Myron C. Harrington (0-81869), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Commanding Officer for Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On the afternoon of 23 February 1968 , Company D was attacking a well entrenched North Vietnamese Army force that was occupying a fortified section of the wall surrounding the Hue Citadel. As the Marines maneuvered forward, they began receiving a heavy volume of small arms, automatic weapons, mortar and antitank rocket fire. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, Captain Harrington skillfully deployed his 3.5 rocket teams into advantageous firing positions. Continuously moving from one position to another, he pinpointed enemy emplacements and skillfully directed the fire of his men. After silencing four hostile positions, he requested supporting arms fire and skillfully adjusted 60-mm. mortar fire to within twenty-five meters of the forward elements of his company, while simultaneously adjusting artillery fire. Disregarding his own safety, Captain Harrington then fearlessly maneuvered to the point of heaviest contact and, rallying his men, boldly led a determined assault against the enemy soldiers. Shouting words of encouragement to his men, he skillfully maneuvered his unit forward and directed the Marines' fire upon the hostile emplacements. Largely due to his resolute determination and intrepid fighting spirit, his men overran the hostile positions and routed the North Vietnamese soldiers, accounting for twenty-five enemy soldiers confirmed killed. By his courage, superb leadership and unfaltering devotion to duty in the face of extreme personal danger, Captain Harrington upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Born: August 13, 1938 at Augusta , Georgia

 

McHENRY, WILLIAM D.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to William D. McHenry (2253419), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Headquarters and Service Company, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 1 February 1968. Corporal McHenry volunteered to accompany a thirty-man reaction force dispatched to aid a Marine unit which had been ambushed while attempting to reinforce the besieged Phu Loc District Headquarters. While en route to the Marine unit the reaction force was ambushed by a numerically superior enemy force, utilizing small-arms and automatic weapons fire. During the initial bursts of fire numerous casualties were sustained, including all the officers. Quickly assessing the situation, Corporal McHenry assumed command and began reorganizing the beleaguered reaction force. Undaunted by the intense enemy fire, he moved from position to position encouraging his men and directing their fire. Observing a wounded Corpsman, he quickly rushed to the wounded man's aid and moved him to a position of relative safety. Ignoring the enemy rounds erupting around him, he administered first aid to other casualties and moved them to covered positions. Corporal McHenry, while attempting to rescue a wounded comrade in an open rice paddy, was wounded in the arm. Despite his wound and in great pain, he obtained a radio and requested artillery fire support. Directed to withdraw to allow artillery fire to be brought to bear on the enemy positions, he ordered his men to withdraw with the casualties and delivered accurate suppressive fire on the enemy to cover the movement of the Marines. Ignoring Corporal McHenry's orders to leave him behind, two fellow Marines physically placed him aboard a vehicle and moved to a position of relative safety. By his bold initiative, intrepid fighting spirit, and loyal devotion to duty, Corporal McHenry reflected great credit upon himself and the Marine Corps and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Cincinnati , Ohio

 

MONTGOMERY, ROBIN L.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robin L. Montgomery (107468), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps (Reserve), for extraordinary heroism while serving as Platoon Commander of the 81-mm. Mortar Platoon, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 8 June 1969, while Second Lieutenant Montgomery was leading the advance party to a previously selected battalion command post site, the Marines were pinned down in an open rice paddy by a heavy volume of mortar, antitank rocket, and automatic weapons fire from enemy troops occupying well-fortified emplacements. Realizing the need for immediate action, Second Lieutenant Montgomery crawled close to the enemy lines and, pinpointing several principal sources of hostile fire, stood in full view of the enemy soldiers as he initiated an aggressive assault against the nearest machine-gun position, destroying it and silencing the fire from that sector. Although seriously wounded during this action, and suffering intense pain, he again braved the enemy fusillade to single-handedly destroy a machine-gun position occupied by several of the enemy. Weakened by loss of blood and the severity of his wounds, he was unable to continue his combat efforts. However, his heroic and determined actions so inspired his vastly outnumbered men that they surged forward and fought through the enemy lines. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and unfaltering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Second Lieutenant Montgomery contributed significantly to the defeat of the enemy force and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Brookfield , Connecticut

*MYERS, WILLIAM HENRY
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to William Henry Myers (2315999), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism in action against elements of the North Vietnamese Army while serving as Assistant Gunner for the first machine-gun team of the Third Squad, Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam during Operation UNION on 12 May 1967. While moving with an aggressive attack by his unit in the vicinity of Que Son, the lead elements came under heavy automatic and semi-automatic small arms, grenade, and mortar fire. The platoon to which Private First Class Myers' gun team was attached maneuvered into position to provide flanking fire against the entrenched enemy soldiers. As his platoon was moving into position it came under intense small-arms fire from a range of about 200 meters. The gunner of the machine-gun team of which Private First Class Myers was a member was instantly killed. Unhesitatingly, Private First Class Myers picked up the gun and boldly advanced through withering fire across 150 meters of open rice paddy in order to place himself in a position to deliver enfilade fire upon the trench works. He skillfully placed his gun into action while bullets and grenades were tearing up the earth on all sides. His deadly fire and accurate aim caused numerous casualties and created untold confusion in the ranks of the enemy. When his ammunition was expended, he fearlessly returned across the open paddy to the body of his fallen gunner and recovered the machine-gun ammunition which the gunner had been carrying. In the face of almost certain death he again crossed the open paddy, returned to his position, and for the second time placed his gun into action. By this time his position had been pinpointed by enemy snipers to his right. With no regard for his own personal safety he continued to pour forth his endless stream of fire into the enemy positions. After approximately three minutes of steady firing, Private First Class Myers was hit by enemy fire and mortally wounded. His steadfast devotion to duty served as an inspiration to the entire company, which then rallied and drove the enemy from its almost impregnable position. Private First Class Myers' extraordinary courage and selfless devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Salem , Indiana

RUSTH, JOHN E.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to John E. Rusth (2274554), Corporal [then Lance Corporal], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam on 10 May 1967. During Operation UNION, Corporal Rusth was moving with the lead elements of his company, as they secured the crest of Hill 110 in Suoi Cho Valley , advancing against an estimated battalion of North Vietnamese Army regulars. Accompanied by other elements of his company, he was leading his fire team to secure the military crest on the northeastern slope, when they came under intense enemy fire from positions concealed in hedgerows, tree lines and cane fields at the base of the hill, sustaining numerous casualties. Immediately assessing the situation, Corporal Rusth moved among the wounded to ensure that all had received proper care, while he steadfastly remained exposed to hostile fire on the bare hillside. He displayed outstanding leadership, courage, and tactical skill, as he aggressively led his men in the grenade and bayonet assault down the hill against the North Vietnamese positions, routing the enemy and forcing it to flee to alternate ground. Corporal Rusth, completely disregarding his own safety, fearlessly moved down the hillside on nine occasions to assist casualties up the slope to safety. Although painfully wounded in his thigh from an enemy round when he began his tenth trip to rescue a wounded Marine, he quickly bound his injury and, displaying exceptional physical stamina and courage, assisted the stricken man to safety before collapsing from the effects of his painful wound and heat exhaustion. By his prompt and courageous action, he was instrumental in saving several Marines from further injury or possible death and contributed significantly to the successful accomplishment of his unit's mission. By his bold initiative and unswerving dedication to duty at great personal risk, Corporal Rusth inspired all who observed him and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Klamath Falls, Oregon

SLIBY, DENNIS M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Dennis M. Sliby (2209054), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 30 March 1968, during Operation HOUSTON, Corporal Sliby's company deployed into defensive positions around several vital bridges in the Phu Bai area. Early the following morning, the company command post, located at the Troui River Bridge in Phu Loc District, came under a heavy mortar and rocket attack followed by a ground assault by two North Vietnamese army companies. Without hesitation, Corporal Sliby rallied his fire team and directed a heavy volume of accurate fire against the enemy. In the ensuing attack, he aggressively maneuvered his men from one position to another in an effort to seize a bunker which had been overrun by the enemy. As he was moving his team into a position to deliver fire into the emplacement, the enemy threw a grenade which landed among his men. With complete disregard for his own life, Corporal Sliby covered the grenade with his body, shielding his companions from the blast. Even though critically wounded, he shouted words of encouragement to his men and directed them into a secure position before crawling, unassisted, to the platoon command post for aid. His timely and selfless actions inspired all who observed him and undoubtedly saved the lives of his men. By his extraordinary courage, bold initiative, and unwavering devotion to duty at great personal risk, Corporal Sliby upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Boston , Massachusetts

 

THOMPSON, ROBERT H.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Robert H. Thompson (0-62346), Lieutenant Colonel [then Major], U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as the Commanding Officer, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in the Republic of Vietnam, from 12 February to 3 March 1968, while participating in Operation HUE CITY, Lieutenant Colonel Thompson aggressively led his battalion in intense fighting against well entrenched North Vietnamese forces within the Citadel. On 13 February, he deployed elements of his unit across the Perfume River to reduce enemy resistance in the southeast corner of the walled city. Almost immediately, small-arms, automatic weapons, and rocket fire from a large North Vietnamese force slowed his advance. Ignoring the intense enemy fire, he moved to an exposed vantage point where he rapidly assessed the situation and unhesitatingly moved across the fire-swept front of his battalion, directing the efforts of the company commanders and shouting words of encouragement to individual Marines, inspiring them to resume the momentum of the attack. Ordered to commence an attack northwest of the city on 28 February, Colonel Thompson fearlessly moved his command group with the attacking companies, repeatedly moving to the areas of heaviest contact in order to personally assist his unit commanders and influence the course of the engagement. When an attached company engaged a well entrenched North Vietnamese force on 1 March, Colonel Thompson accompanied a reinforcing unit dispatched to establish a blocking position to prevent the enemy's escape. Located with the lead elements, he personally coordinated supporting arms fire with the movement of the advancing Marines as they overwhelmed the enemy and accomplished the mission. By his intrepid fighting spirit, inspiring leadership, and selfless devotion to duty at great personal risk, Colonel Thompson upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Corinth , Mississippi

TONKYN, MICHAEL S.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Michael S. Tonkyn (2255465), Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Squad Leader with Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. During the early morning hours of 11 June 1969 , while Company C was providing battalion security northwest of An Hoa in Quang Nam Province , the Marines came under a heavy volume of mortar, rocket, and small-arms fire from an estimated three North Vietnamese Army companies. In the initial moments of the ensuing fierce engagement, ten well- armed hostile soldiers infiltrated the company perimeter and took cover in a trenchline approximately twenty meters behind Lance Corporal Tonkyn's platoon. Reacting instantly, Lance Corporal Tonkyn and a companion crawled across the unprotected area to throw grenades and deliver rifle fire upon the invaders. When his comrade was seriously wounded and fell into the hostile trenchline, Lance Corporal Tonkyn leaped into the emplacement and dragged the injured Marine to a safe location. Then, determined to dislodge or kill the North Vietnamese soldiers, he returned to the enemy emplacement to continue his efforts. On four occasions, Lance Corporal Tonkyn maneuvered across the fire-swept terrain to procure additional hand grenades, and boldly raced along the position firing his rifle and throwing grenades, personally accounting for six hostile soldiers killed. His exceptional display of valor instilled confidence and aggressiveness in other Marines, who subsequently came to his assistance and eliminated the remainder of the enemy unit, thereby preventing the destruction of friendly mortar positions. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of grave personal danger, Lance Corporal Tonkyn contributed significantly to the accomplishment of his unit's mission and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Mendham , New Jersey

*WARD, JAMES CLINTON
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to James Clinton Ward (2439597), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Weapons Squad Leader with Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 9 May 1969 , Corporal Ward's platoon was returning from a combat patrol when the lead element came under a heavy volume of hostile fire from a numerically superior force occupying well-concealed emplacements. Reacting instantly, Corporal Ward skillfully deployed his squad into effective fighting positions and directed counterfire on the enemy unit. Alertly observing that one of his fire teams had been pinned down in a dangerously exposed position and had sustained two serious casualties, he unhesitatingly mustered four companions and was boldly leading them across the fire- swept terrain when a grenade launcher round carried in the belt of a Marine maneuvering close beside him was detonated by enemy fire. Although partially blinded by the concussion of the grenade, Corporal Ward, concerned only for the safety of his injured comrades, resolutely continued his determined efforts to reach the fire team. With his light antitank assault weapon he quickly destroyed an enemy emplacement, which was the principal source of hostile fire, and reaching the side of one of his wounded men, he quickly administered first aid. After speaking words of encouragement to his comrade to restore his confidence, he moved through the hazardous area to the side of the second injured Marine. Unable to drag the casualty to a place of relative safety and undaunted by the closeness of enemy gun emplacements, Corporal Ward was boldly attempting to lift the wounded Marine onto his shoulders when he was mortally injured by enemy fire. By his courage, selfless concern for his comrades, and unwavering devotion to duty, Corporal Ward upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Alexandria , Virginia

 

 WEBB, JAMES H., JR.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to James H. Webb, Jr. (106180), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a Platoon Commander with Company D, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with combat operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 10 July 1969, while participating in a company-sized search and destroy operation deep in hostile territory, First Lieutenant Webb's platoon discovered a well-camouflaged bunker complex which appeared to be unoccupied. Deploying his men into defensive positions, First Lieutenant Webb was advancing to the first bunker when three enemy soldiers armed with hand grenades jumped out. Reacting instantly, he grabbed the closest man and, brandishing his .45 caliber pistol at the others, apprehended all three of the soldiers. Accompanied by one of his men, he then approached the second bunker and called for the enemy to surrender. When the hostile soldiers failed to answer him and threw a grenade which detonated dangerously close to him, First Lieutenant Webb detonated a claymore mine in the bunker aperture, accounting for two enemy casualties and disclosing the entrance to a tunnel. Despite the smoke and debris from the explosion and the possibility of enemy soldiers hiding in the tunnel, he then conducted a thorough search which yielded several items of equipment and numerous documents containing valuable intelligence data. Continuing the assault, he approached a third bunker and was preparing to fire into it when the enemy threw another grenade. Observing the grenade land dangerously close to his companion, First Lieutenant Webb simultaneously fired his weapon at the enemy, pushed the Marine away from the grenade, and shielded him from the explosion with his own body. Although sustaining painful fragmentation wounds from the explosion, he managed to throw a grenade into the aperture and completely destroy the remaining bunker. By his courage, aggressive leadership, and selfless devotion to duty, First Lieutenant Webb upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Born: February 9, 1946 at St. Joseph , Missouri
Home Town : St. Joseph , Missouri

NAVY CORPSMEN

STRODE, GERALD M.
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Gerald M. Strode (B809190), Hospitalman Third Class, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism on 4 September 1967, while serving as a Corpsman with the First Platoon, Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in connection with operations against North Vietnamese Army forces in the Republic of Vietnam. At this time, Company B was engaged in Operation SWIFT in Quang Ngai Province , and came under heavy small-arms, automatic-weapons, and mortar fire from an estimated regimental-sized North Vietnamese Army force. Without hesitation, Petty Officer Strode moved to the point of initial contact, undaunted by the heavy volume of fire, and began administering first aid to the casualties. In order to protect his wounded comrades, he utilized a pistol and hand grenades effectively in their defense. Although wounded, he then engaged in hand- to-hand combat until the enemy withdrew. Starting once again to treat the wounded, Petty Officer Strode carried his injured comrades to a protected area about seventy-five meters away. When he returned to the line, he worked continuously through the night with the casualties until he was relieved by the company Corpsman the next morning, caring for his own wounds and allowing himself to be evacuated only when all other casualties had been evacuated. By his swift actions, professional skill, and cool demeanor under fire, he inspired the men of his platoon and undoubtedly saved many lives, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Moses Lake , Washington

 

*WILLEFORD, FRANKLIN PATRIC
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to Franklin Patric Willeford (3537852), Hospitalman, U.S. Navy, for extraordinary heroism on 14 December 1968 while serving as a Platoon Corpsman in Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division (Reinforced), Fleet Marine Force, in Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam. As Hospitalman Willeford's platoon was participating in a company-sized sweep through an area, the lead element came under intensive automatic-weapons fire which wounded and trapped one Marine in very close proximity to one of the enemy bunkers. Seeing his comrade fall and subsequently receive another hit from a grenade, Hospitalman Willeford unhesitatingly left his position of relative security and moved forward to the side of the mortally-wounded Marine. Hidden from the enemy positions by the tall grass in the area, he found the Marine bleeding severely and in no condition to be moved. Hospitalman Willeford raised himself up and into the grazing zone of hostile fire in order to administer a heart massage and mouth- to-mouth resuscitation, continuing his desperate attempts to save the Marine until all hope of life had expired. Only then did he begin the slow return through the fire-swept zone to the trench line, bringing with him the body of his comrade. As his platoon again started through the area, the enemy opened up with intensive small-arms and automatic-weapons fire, wounding and trapping the three lead Marines. When two Marines started to move out of the trench line to retrieve the casualties, one was mortally wounded and the other critically wounded. Disregarding the intense danger, Hospitalman Willeford again moved forward to aid his fellowman. Finding the first Marine mortally wounded, and realizing the impossibility of trying to move him back to a secure area, Hospitalman Willeford stayed with the Marine, rendering what aid and comfort he could, until the Marine succumbed to his injuries. After he had informed the remainder of the platoon that the Marine had died, he proceeded deeper into the fire zone toward the second Marine, and drew fire from an enemy bunker a short distance from the wounded man. With full knowledge that the enemy was now concentrating their fire upon him, Hospitalman Willeford forged his way through the tall grass to the wounded Marines' side and began administering aid. While treating the fallen Marine, Hospitalman Willeford was also struck and mortally wounded. His courageous actions were an inspiration to all who observed him and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
Authority: Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals
Home Town : Lawton , Oklahoma.

 

 

BARDWELL, ROBERT J.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes Pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Robert J. Bardwell (6897172), Hospital Corpsman , U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam . Hospital Corpsman Bardwell distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 17 July 1965 while serving as a Corpsman attached to Company A, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.
Home Town : Winfield , Kansas

BATES, GILYARD H.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes Pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Gilyard H. Bates (327217), Hospital Corpsman Third Class , U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam . Hospital Corpsman Third Class Bates distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 7 January 1968 while serving with First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.
Home Town : Crane, Indiana

*ELROD, JAMES T.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes Pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to James T. Elrod (6954121), Hospital Corpsman Third Class , U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam . Hospital Corpsman Third Class Elrod distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 10 August 1966 while serving as a Corpsman attached to Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.
Home Town : Moultrie , Georgia

*GILLIES, ROBERT KNELL
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes Pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Robert Knell Gillies (9164494), Hospital Corpsman Third Class , U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam . Hospital Corpsman Third Class Gillies distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 21 April 1969 while serving as a Corpsman attached to Company B, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.
Home Town : Mantua , New Jersey

WATSON, DONALD P.
Synopsis:
The President of the United States takes Pleasure in presenting the Silver Star Medal to Donald P. Watson (9987809), Hospital Corpsman Third Class , U.S. Navy, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam . Hospital Corpsman Third Class Watson distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 10 May 1967 while serving as a Corpsman attached to Company C, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division. His unquestionable valor in close combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Naval Service.
Home Town : Chicago , Illinois

*KEEFE, FLOYD M. (KIA)
Citation:
The President of the United States takes pride in presenting the Silver Star Medal (Posthumously) to Floyd M. Keefe (1332594), Gunnery Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as Noncommissioned Officer in Charge of Food Service, First Battalion, Fifth Marines, FIRST Marine Division, in connection with operations against the enemy in the Republic of Vietnam. On 19 March 1969 , the Battalion Command Post at Phu Lac came under an intense ground attack from approximately two hundred enemy sappers who were supported by rockets and mortars. Reacting instantly, Gunnery Sergeant Keefe was rushing to his defensive position adjacent to the mess hall when he observed six hostile soldiers who had penetrated the defensive wire and were moving toward the command bunker. Realizing the seriousness of the situation, he fearlessly moved between the enemy and the command bunker and began delivering rifle fire upon the soldiers who were firing at him. After killing one hostile soldier and forcing the others to take cover, Gunnery Sergeant Keefe continued firing his rifle as he attempted to reach a fighting trench, but was knocked to the ground by the explosion of an enemy grenade. While steadfastly endeavoring to recover from the blast and continue his aggressive efforts, he was mortally wounded by hostile automatic weapons fire. His heroic and timely actions inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in preventing the destruction of the Battalion Command Bunker. By his courage, aggressive fighting spirit and selfless devotion to duty, Gunnery Sergeant Keefe upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.
Home Town : Montgomery , Alabama

 

Name Rank Date of Action Unit
Allen, Joe E. 2/Lt 24-May-68 C/1/5
Baker, Sam R., II Sgt 10-Aug-66 A/1/5
Bickley, Leroy A. Maj 26-Feb-70 OO/1/5
Billings, Roger L. L/Cpl 22-Feb-68 C/1/5
Black, Charles H. Maj 6-Sep-67 OO/1/5
Byers, James N., V 2/Lt 11-Sep-68 C/1/5
Call, John G. L/Cpl 4-Sep-67 B/1/5
Candelario, Rafael A. Sgt 9-May-69 A/1/5
Castagnetti, Gene E. Capt 9-Jun-69 B/1/5
Caswell, Russell J. Capt 10-May-67 C/1/5
Charlie, Peter L/Cpl 8-Aug-70 B/1/5
Cody, Richard L. Capt 7-Oct-68 A/1/5
Cruz, Luis A. L/Cpl 4-Nov-70 B/1/5
Deal, Earl M. L/Cpl 18-Jan-68 H&S/1/5
Desmond, Lawrence E. Cpl 13-Feb-68 C/1/5
Dougherty, James E. Sgt 7-Feb-68 B/1/5
Drollinger, Harry . 2/Lt 1-Feb-68 B/1/5
Drury, Paul S. L/Cpl 4-Aug-68 C/1/5
Dustin, Charles R. Sgt 20-Mar-68 B/1/5
Estes, Edward S. L/Cpl 13-Feb-68 C/1/5
Farlow, Gary A. L/Cpl 12-May-67 C/1/5
Fulford, Carlton ., Jr. 2/Lt 4-Sep-67 C/1/5
Graves, Joel E. Cpl 3-May-69 B/1/5
Green, Maurice O.V. 1/Lt 3-Feb-68 C/1/5
Hammons, Herbert D. L/Cpl 15-Feb-68 C/1/5
Harrington, Myron C., Jr. Capt 15-Feb-68 C/1/5
Hayes, Ray A. Sgt 17-Sep-68 A/1/5
Henderson, Jim A., Jr. Cpl 2-Jun-67 C/1/5
Herlihy, Patrick E. PFC 29-Aug-68 C/1/5
Hilgartner, Peter L. LTC Sep 4-6, 1967 CO/1/5
Jandik, Frank, Jr. Sgt 15-Feb-68 C/1/5
Jenkins, Charles E. Sgt 4-Sep-67 C/1/5
Keefe, Floyd M. G/Sgt 19-Mar-69 H&S/1/5
Keshner, Keo J. PFC 8-Jun-69 A/1/5
Lanham, Daniel L. L/Cpl 29-Aug-68 C/1/5
Leshow, William F. Cpl 10-May-67 C/1/5
Lopez, Joseph PFC 13-Feb-68 C/1/5
Madden, Ernest J. Cpl 12-May-67 C/1/5
Marks, David C. Sgt 9-Jun-69 B/1/5
Martin, Ervin P., Jr. 2/Lt 29-Aug-68 C/1/5
Martin, Rodney J. PFC 26-Oct-68 C/1/5
Mayer, Brian S. Cpl 22-Feb-68 H&S/1/5
McInturff, David L. 1/Lt 2-Jun-67 H&S/1/5
McNally, Paul A. L/Cpl 12-May-67 C/1/5
Meyer, Ronald William 2/Lt 16-Jun-66 C/1/5
Mitchell, Curtis PFC 4-Sep-67 B/1/5
Mitchell, Thomas E., Jr. Sgt 24-May-68 C/1/5
Mixon, Michael J. Sgt 4-Sep-67 B/1/5
Morris, Richard A. Cpl 22-Feb-68 C/1/5
Murphy, Edward T. Cpl 21-May-67 B/1/5
Nunez, Larry B. Cpl 4-Sep-67  
Persons, Henry H. 1/Lt 1-Feb-68 5-Jan
Peters, James E. PFC 11-Sep-68 C/1/5
Petit, Matthew M. L/Cpl 20-Dec-67 C/1/5
Pilson, Darwin R. Sgt 10-Sep-66 B/1/5
Ratcliffe, Edward K. Cpl 19-Feb-67 C/1/5
Reese, Merle W. G/Sgt 13-Mar-67  
Rosolie, Walter W. Cpl 13-Feb-68 A/1/5
Ross, Ronald J. Cpl 7-Feb-68 H&S/5
Rowe, Larry E. PFC 9-Jun-69 B/1/5
Rozanski, Edward C. L/Cpl 4-Sep-67 C/1/5
Schmidt, Joseph A., Jr. Cpl 4-Sep-67 H&S/1/5
Schneider, Gerald B. Cpl 10-Sep-68 C/1/5
Scott, Fred S. L/Cpl 5-Sep-67 C/1/5
Sexton, Raymond D. L/Cpl 15-Feb-68 C/1/5
Sims, John D. L/Cpl 29-Aug-68 C/1/5
Smith, Ralph E. Cpl 12-May-67 C/1/5
Soard, Charles L/Cpl 29-Jan-70 C/1/5
Soderling, Jerry M. S/Sgt 10-May-67 A/1/5
Thompson, Harvey E. L/Cpl 5-Jan-68 C/1/5
Thompson, Robert B. Cpl 20-Apr-68 B/1/5
Thoms, Robert L. S/Sgt 15-Feb-68 C/1/5
Todd, Gary G. 2/Lt 24-Jun-69 C/1/5
Torrey, Phillip H., III Capt 9-Jun-69 A/1/5
Vacca, William P. 2/Lt 24-May-67 H&S/1/5
Vanzandt, Ray L. Cpl 2-Jun-67 C/1/5
Walker, Arthur G. G/Sgt 19-Mar-69 H&S/1/5
Wandro, James Matthew PFC 11-Jun-69 C/1/5
Webb, James H., Jr. 1/Lt 9-May-69 C/1/5
Wells, Robert D. L/Cpl 9-Jun-69 B/1/5
Whitmer, Maurice P. Cpl 15-Feb-68 C/1/5
Williams, Johnny B. PFC 29-Aug-68 C/1/5
Wilson, Dale E. Sgt 17-Nov-69 C/1/5
Winston, William O. Cpl 10-May-67 C/1/5
Woods, Theodore Cpl 9-Jun-69 B/1/5
York, Hillous Sgt 10-May-67 C/1/5
Zell, Richard M. 1/Lt 11-Apr-67 A/1/5